The Arsonists
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The Arsonists is an absurdest comedic play written by Max Frisch, a Swiss playwright whose work was considered to be highly representative of German literature after World War II. His works dealt with issues such as human identity, responsibility, morality and political awareness -- almost always written with a strong sense of irony. The Arsonists, or Firebugs as it is also known, was written in 1953, and premiered in 1958. The play was written as a metaphor for Nazism and Communism and shows how normal citizens can be taken in by evil.  This dark comedy is set in a town that is being regularly attacked by arsonists. Disguised as homeless, they talk their way into people's homes, settle down in the attic, then prepare to burn it down. The central character, a businessman called Gottlieb Biedermann, is seen at the beginning reading newspaper reports of arson, convinced that he could never be taken in. Within minutes, the first arsonist has appeared (Joe Schmitz). Through a combination of intimidation and persuasion he talks his way into spending the night in the attic. As the play unfolds, a second arsonist appears (Billy Eisenring), and before Biedermann can do anything to stop it, his attic is filled with drums full of petrol. He even helps them measure the detonating fuse wire and ultimately gives them matches. He refuses to believe what is happening around him, and becomes an accomplice in his own downfall. When his wife admonishes him for giving them matches, he defends his action by screaming back at her, “They had no matches!  How could they be arsonists?”  The name Biedermann is itself a play on the German word "bieder" meaning conventional, conservative or upstanding, and is frequently used in an ironic context. The name translates to der biedere Mann or the worthy man. Note: I wanted to ensure the play was well visualized for everyone who was not able to attend a performance. In the interest of space and because there are so many screencaps, these images are small, however, they are all pop-ups that will expand when you click on them.
The Odyssey Theater Ensemble The Arsonists Cast: Mr. Gottlieb Biedermann:    Norbert Weisser Mrs. Babbete Biedermann:    Beth Hogan Arsonist Joe Schmitz    John Achorn Arsonists Billy Eisenring:    Ron Bottitta Anna (the Maid):    Diana Cignoni The Philosophy Professor:    Alan Abelew The Policeman:   Cary Thompson Mrs. Knechtling:    Chantal DeGroat Members of the Chorus:    Chantal DeGroat    Alan Abelew    Cary Thompson    Beth Hogan    Diana Cignoni Directed by:  Ron Sossi and Barbara Mueller-Wittman Set Designer: Birgitte Moos The Odyssey Theater is located on Sepulveda Blvd. in Los Angeles, CA Become a Fan of The Odyssey Theater on Facebook!
All of the chorus members had multiple roles -- it must have made for an exhausting performance! All of the chorus members had multiple roles -- it must have made for an exhausting performance! Two members of the chorus, Diana Cignoni and Beth Hogan. Diana also had the role of Anna, the Maid, and Beth had the additional role of Mrs. Beidermann. Two members of the chorus, Diana Cignoni and Beth Hogan. Diana also had the role of Anna, the Maid, and Beth had the additional role of Mrs. Beidermann.
As Biedermann attempts to light a cigarette, the chorus of fire fighters keep blowing out the flame. He says, “It’s not easy lighting a cigarette these days -- the whole world thinks they are about to go up in flames.”
The fire fighters appear on stage occasionally as a chorus to offer commentary on the situation and to explain how they keep watch over the city.
As Biedermann reads the morning paper, he tells Anna (Diana Cignoni)  that the fire bombers were at it again, and cautions her that the homeless come knocking at the door looking for a handout and a place to stay. She then tells him that a man is waiting in the hall for him... he is looking for a little humanity.
John Achorn as the first Arsonist. John's performance was simply outstanding! John Achorn as the first Arsonist. John's performance was simply outstanding!
The homeless man appears and scares Biederman right out of his chair. His manner becomes nervous and timid. John Achorn is the homeless man, Joe Schmitz.
Biedermann offers him a cigarette. Schmitz tells him people are afraid of him. He says how he saw Biedermann in a restaurant the night before, proclaiming that the arsonists should hang. He says how he worked at the circus... until it burned down...  and how he used to be a wrestler. He clearly has the upper hand in the conversation.
By this time, Biedermann is completely cowed by Schmitz. His performance as a complete and total nervous wreck is terrific. By this time, Biedermann is completely cowed by Schmitz. His performance as a complete and total nervous wreck is terrific.
“No spare beds! That’s what they all say as soon as a homeless man appears at the door!” He had overheard Biedermann telling Anna that that had three spare beds. Mr. Biedermann anxiously awaits Anna to bring bread for his guest as he offers him an ashtray.
In addition to the offer of bread, Schmitz also asks for some butter, cheese, cold meat, pickles -- anything they have extra on hand, possibly some mustard too... managing to add “Where would we all be if we stopped believing in each other.” He thanks Biedermann for not treating him like an arsonist. Biedermann tries to explain why people are afraid -- the arsons are all the newspapers write about, so trust is hard since it’s always the same scenario.
John Achorn is fun to watch as Schmitz -- his manners are crude, yet he does it all with a certain charm that is a delight to watch. John Achorn is fun to watch as Schmitz -- his manners are crude, yet he does it all with a certain charm that is a delight to watch.
Schmitz, or Joe as he as asks to be called, has a small complaint that the wine isn’t quite the right temperature. Meanwhile Anna has announced another visitor whom Biedermann turns away. It’s a former employee by the name of Knechtling, who wants to share his profits from the hair tonic product he invented.
Joe licks only some of the mustard off of his hand before he offers to shake Biedermann’s hand, thanking him for his humanity. A disgusted Biedermann is quick to wipe his hand on a handkerchief. Having talked his way into spending the night in the attic, Biedermann shows him up to the room, warning him to be quiet so his wife won’t hear. He doesn’t want to alarm her because she has a heart condition. He also asks Joe to promise him that he isn’t an arsonist.
Mrs. Biederman (Beth Hogan) has praise for her husband for checking the attic for arsonists. She thinks he is the one up there not realizing that the noise she hears is Joe dropping his shoes on the floor as he quietly sings, “I don’t want to set the world on fire...”  Later on when Biedermann is sleeping she hears coughing in the attic and thinks someone is up there. She is nervous and can’t sleep a wink. Meanwhile, the fire fighters are shouting joyously, “All hail the fire fighters! Everyone is safe one more night!”
Biedermann prepares to head to work as his wife tells him she is afraid someone was in the attic. He tells her not to worry saying we have to have faith and a bit of trust. “Where would we all be if we thought everyone was an arsonist!” Just then Joe appears and startles Mrs. Biedermann. Her intention is to serve him breakfast and have him be on his way. However, as she serves him coffee with shaking hands, he gives her an imploring, innocent look as he drinks it. When he asks if she wants to get rid of him she is too timid to say yes, and denies that she thinks he is an arsonist. He then tells her the story of how his father, a miner, died when he was young, and his mother too, so he was raised in an orphanage.
Beth Hogan and Norbert Weisser were well matched in this play -- they both pull off the nervous twitches and laughs in a great way. Beth Hogan and Norbert Weisser were well matched in this play -- they both pull off the nervous twitches and laughs in a great way.
Even when he asks her if she thinks he eats like a pig, she giggles nervously and denies it, afraid to hurt his feelings. He plays on her sympathies again by saying that he is used to the hunger and the cold -- so he will leave if she wants him to. She ends up asking him to stay so he won’t think bad of her. Joe then realizes she won’t send him away, and complains that his soft boiled eggs are too runny. He also hints that his friend Billy will be joining them. By the time Biedermann arrives home from work, the second arsonist has arrived through the skylight, and they have started to fill the attic with drums of petrol.
The look Joe gives Mrs. Biedermann in this scene is simply wonderful! The look Joe gives Mrs. Biedermann in this scene is simply wonderful!
Biedermann goes to the attic to tell Joe that he must go. He is unaware that Billy is also in the attic and the two of them are bringing in barrels of fuel. He is shocked to find the second man there and becomes even more nervous than he already was. It turns out Billy was a head waiter at a restaurant...  before the place burned down...  Even though Biederman blusters that he is really angry about the second man and wants them gone, he is too intimidated by them to really do anything about it.
Ron Bottitta is wonderful as Billy -- a slight Cockney accent and a manner that is a perfect contrast toSchmitz. Ron Bottitta is wonderful as Billy -- a slight Cockney accent and a manner that is a perfect contrast toSchmitz.
When Biedermann realizes there is a barrel of fuel in the attic he demands to know where is comes from, to which the arsonists sarcastically reply, “I think it’s imported.” The canvas sheet is taken off the other barrels, sending Biedermann into a complete panic. He asks what’s really in those drums. He reminds them that the papers are full of reports about the arsonists and that he will call the police if the drums aren’t removed. The second arsonists, Billy, is seeing a different side of Biedermann, and Joe keeps repeating, “He wasn’t like that yesterday.”
When a policeman arrives to tell Biedermann that his former employee killed himself by sticking his head in a gas oven, Biederman shows no sadness at the news. The policeman asks about the drums. An uneasy Biedermann tells him that it’s his invention of hair rejuvenator, and let’s the officer believe the two men are his employees. A new day comes and Biederman again reads the newspaper accounts of what has happened the previous day.
As Biedermann goes to catch a taxi to go to work, the chorus states that we fail to clearly see what is happening right now, and instead we dwell on what has already happened by reading the newspapers. They try to make him see the truth about the barrels of fuel in his attic. He reminds them that we can’t go around thinking everyone is an arsonist, and says that he was just about to throw them out in the middle of the night -- he couldn’t sleep because he knew it was fuel in the barrels.
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